Customize Your Own Soft Air Gun

An airsoft, or soft air, gun is a mass-produced non-gunpowder-using replica of an actual weapon, a concept created by the Japanese in the 1980s and now produced by a number of manufacturers under various trade names. Customize your own airsoft gun by painting it with a color not expected to be found on the weapon. A few supplies from a hobby shop are all that is needed as is a well ventilated space for doing the customization.

Instructions

1. Place a sheet of newspaper on a work surface. Tape sheets of newspaper to the sides of the work surface so that none of the work surface’s top is visible.

2. Remove the magazine from the airsoft gun. Place the magazine aside.

3. Wrap masking tape around all of the areas of the gun that you do not want to be painted–for example, the trigger, clip release. safety and hammer. Cover all holes and gaps on the gun with masking tape.

4. Cover any exposed firing, cocking or loading mechanism on the gun with masking tape.

5. Examine the gun to make sure that there are no other areas that need to be covered. Place the gun on the newspaper with the barrel pointing to the left.

6. Apply a coat of spray paint on the gun, starting at the tip of the barrel and moving across to the hammer at the other end. Let the paint dry for three hours. Repeat this procedure to apply another coat of purple paint on the gun. Let the paint dry for three hours.

7. Turn the gun over. Repeat the procedure to apply two coats of purple paint.

8. Stand the gun on its handle. Apply a coat of purple paint around the tip of the barrel (whose hole is covered with masking tape). Let the paint dry for three hours before applying another coat of paint around the tip of the barrel.

9. Hold the gun so that the hammer is pointing up. Apply a coat of purple paint to the back edge of the gun. Let the paint dry for three hours before applying another coat of paint to the back edge.

10. Carefully remove all of the masking tape from the gun. Place the magazine back into the gun. Dispose of the newspaper and the empty cans of spray paint.