Use Nitrogen In Paintball Guns

You can use nitrogen gas to fire your paintball gun.

Paintball guns, also called markers, can use nitrogen tanks to propel the paintballs out of the gun. Serious paintball players use nitrogen tanks, which come in two standard sizes of 3,000 or 4,500 PSI, because a gun with a nitrogen tank can fire more paintballs than a gun with a CO2 tank. Playing paintball using a nitrogen tank is simple due to the basic components that attach the tank to the paintball gun.

Instructions

1. Inspect the nitrogen tank prior to attaching the tank to the paintball gun. Check the O-ring to make sure it is not broken. The O-ring, a rubber washer located at the top of the paintball tank, prevents air from leaking out of the tank. Replace a broken O-ring by sliding a new one around the threaded top of the tank.

2. Attach the nitrogen tank on the paintball gun’s air adapter, located toward the bottom rear of the gun. Fit the nitrogen tank tightly in place by twisting it clockwise. If the threads are not smooth or the tank won’t screw into place, rub two drops of gun oil with your finger around the threads to lubricate them. Listen for the air from the tank rushing into the paintball gun–this will tell you that you have fitted the tank correctly.

3. Fill the nitrogen tank if the pressure gauge shows less than 500 PSI. Remove the rubber cap, located next to the pressure gauge, from the nitrogen tank. Attach the fill station hose adapter to the metal fill component on the tank. The fill station will fill the paintball tank with nitrogen to the proper PSI level, which can be either 3,000 or 4,500 PSI. Remove the fill station hose adapter from the tank once the tank is filled. Replace the rubber cap to prevent paint or dirt from entering the tank while playing the game.

4. Remove the nitrogen tank from the paintball gun for transport and easy storage once the game is finished. Empty all of the paintballs from the hopper and chamber. While twisting the nitrogen tank counterclockwise, fire the paintball gun repetitively to remove trapped excess air between the gun and the tank. Store the nitrogen tank at room temperature for safekeeping.